Carrot Date and Orange Salad

Showcase your culinary creativity to your friends and family guests at home, or dazzle everyone at the office, without saucing, pureeing, or caramelizing anything. A luscious salad always makes an impressive presentation, no matter what kind of gathering is the setting for its debut. Serving a gorgeous, crisp salad says to everyone in attendance that you are a person of quality. Coming on the scene bearing a salad fit for fine dining speaks volumes about your philosophy on food and on living well. It communicates respect for the health and wellbeing of your guests. Also, creating a salad that accomplishes an image that is both understated and spectacular at once truly exhibits your artistic capacity. Here’s a salad that achieves all of these high ambitions. This easy recipe renders a lovely, all-season assemblage that makes salad exciting again. And, its striking heritage in the exotic Moroccan culinary arts gives this international dish a mystic that will thrill your guests and authenticate you as a person of great culinary ideas – bold enough to express yourself simply and subtle enough to be of great character. When your guests taste the freshness that you’ve brought to the table in this colorful creation, your North African salad rendering will be the hands-down winner for uniqueness and taste.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 cups chopped Romaine lettuce
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and grated
  • 1/4 cup pitted dates
  • 1 Navel orange, peeled and cut into segments
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 Tsp. Orange Blossom Water
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • Freshly ground pepper

DIRECTIONS:
Begin by placing the Romaine lettuce on a small platter or large plate. Sprinkle the grated carrots over the top of the bed of lettuce. Cut the dates into halves, and scatter them around on the top of the salad. You can use any kind of dates that you like. Next, place some orange segments here and there. You can use Blood Orange, Navel Orange, Tangerine, or any other orange you prefer. Add as many as you like.

Next, make the vinaigrette. Mix the juice of 1 lemon with the juice of an orange. The secret ingredient for the vinaigrette is a Moroccan favorite – Orange Blossom Water. Just add 1 teaspoon, or as much as you like. Whisk the ingredients together. As soon as these ingredients are whisked together, slowly add in the olive oil while whisking quickly. Whisking quickly while adding the olive oil slowly will help all of the ingredients to incorporate, and will cause the vinaigrette to become nice and thick. Now add a pinch of black pepper to the vinaigrette. Add pepper to taste.

Top the salad with the vinaigrette, and you now have the perfect salad to add a distinctive Moroccan flavor to any meal.

Remember, use only the freshest ingredients in order to craft a salad of the highest integrity – a true masterpiece. To afford your special salad a point of interest in its backstory, consider shopping for the produce at your local farmers’ market, or find at least one or two of your ingredients at an open produce market or vegetable cooperative. Or, if one is available in your local area, make the trip to a farm or orchard that offers a program for you to go out picking for yourself! Ask around your community, or check on-line for resources. Call ahead to ensure that the produce you’re looking for is in season before you plan your day around a visit to pick your own fruits or vegetables. Picking seasons are generally in warm weather, so take a hat, wear appropriate shoes, and otherwise dress for the occasion. Picking your own produce can be a fun activity for the entire family.

Adding the incomparable features of some extra energy, initiative, and even personal involvement with the earth, in obtaining your ingredients elevates your salad to something more than food. It becomes a commentary on your lifestyle and on your commitment to quality. This simple, elegant Moroccan specialty stands up to such ideals, and is worthy to be invested in. Choosing this unusual and fresh food idea is an excellent approach to a whole new way of thinking about what food selection and preparation represents.

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